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20130117
20130117
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
this out. i just want the squabbling to stop. this is worst than the fiscal squabbling and the debt ceiling. you know why? the stakes are higher. we're talking human lives. those little baby angels. let's try in their memory to figure something out if stead of hurling epithat's and talking about impeaching the president and imperial presidency and all this crap. tonight i hope we'll do that. we have the president of the naacp, we have nationally syndicated lars larson and congresswoman nan hayward. i'm not opposed to types this bill. cheap shots squabbling is wrong. this is a national tragedy. we need to do something about it. ben, may i begin with you. >> sure. >> what is your position on the president's view and do you believe that if he got what he wants, it would have stopped the awful heinous tragedy at sandy hook in newtown, connecticut which is right next door to where i live? >> we're very supportive of a whole lot that's in this bill. and it's clear that this would have made it harder to get these sorts of guns in the first place, harder to buy the high capacity clips, harder for a
accompanying his request for yet another debt ceiling height. gerri: how did you react to the presence tone in that last press conference when he talked about his upcoming debt ceiling despite? he seemed a little angrier you guys. >> yes, he did. he seemed annoyed at the fact that he had to deal with a coequal branch of government. a group of pesky individuals elected by the people. >> yes, that's right. we have the audacity to insist that we follow the law and that we continue to make the law and yes, we have our work cut out for us. >> i was noticing that since 1990, we have raised the debt ceiling 18 times. back in 1990 come the first time we raised it, the debt ceiling was $3.12 trillion. the debt ceiling is raised, the spending gets raised. and it never comes back down. >> that's right, it goes up and it never comes back down. in the past, sometimes we have insisted on cuts along the way. now we're finding ourselves in a position where we have $16.5 trillion of debt and cuts are not going to cut it anymore. it has to be more than cuts. it needs to be permanent structural spending refor
out its tactics over the debt ceiling. the community seems divided as to whether it should link spending cuts according to the washington post survey deliberately to that ceiling or not. 48% say yes, 45% of gop members say, no, you shouldn't lipg the two. what would generate the best outcome in your view? >> the problem with trying to do that, to link it to the debt ceiling, the president may call the gop's bluff, in which case social security may not be paid or other things may not be paid. my guess is that debt -- interest on the debt will be paid, but we've seen this movie before. we've seen what happens when the government shuts down or even partially shuts down. all you have to do is ask newt gingrich that. it's not good. i think there is a way that the gop can get the president to come in and negotiate and that has to do with a squeser which begins in march. >> the automatic spending cuts which affect discretionary spending as well as the defense department. each of them, they affect 8 to 10% reduction in expenditures. that's really painful to the gop but it's also very pa
that's a debt ceiling, whether that's gun control, whether that's immigration, but as long as you're not on record supporting it, you won't be in danger of getting primaried in 2014, and all is well. sdmri think that's a great point that jonathan made there, and i have heard a lot of other reporters who have been talking to people about the debt ceiling and the sequester fights saying we're going down the road of doom, the country is going to default. you know, boehner broke the hastert rule once because of larger necessity, and i don't think that doing that makes it any less likely is he going to do that. i really do think these guys as long as they get to take the vote that they want don't really necessarily -- this doesn't stand for all of them, but as a group they don't necessarily care. >> jonathan makes the point that on the sandy relief bill they did the same thing, which was register opposition, pass it with democratic help. i feel like that is sort of under mining short-changes thinking republicans, which is to say can you do this for two years? basically register opposit
over the debt ceiling. in the past the debt ceiling reminded folks we were borrowing too much and we needed to make changes. it could be a useful reminder not if it goes as far as people really start to worry about in the u.s. government and economic damage which is what we saw last time. the third piece of the resolution the fact that government spending is going to expire and these three issues is another kind of fiscal cliff and the question is is it going to force action with the hardest pieces that are still remaining were the fact when it comes to the fiscal clef they still for all intensive purposes it's good we didn't go over the fiscal cliff, it's good we raise revenue, but we basically did what we always do in washington which is we punted all the hard choices and a sort of tried to declare a bipartisan victory. but it wasn't theirs of the question was what's going to make these next action forcing moments more effective in getting us to take on the policy and this was a part of your question that will deal with the necessary savings for the next ten years. but just as impo
need to do in the u.s. is for the two sides to get together to come up with a comprehensive debt and deficit reduction plan. the debt ceiling and all around it doesn't really solve the problem. it is a waste of time. adam: let me interrupt you because we have had this debt ceiling essentially part of our discussion for almost 100 years, going back to 1917 with the issue of liberty bonds. now today we talk about the debt ceiling and we talk about its impact, this debate for the people who are watching, and, getting to this craziness we see the market reacting in a way you can't anticipate. what would happen to our 401(k) if congress he said they have to get together, i was thinking two words, "good luck." whether they can't do something? >> if they don't raise the debt ceiling and let's say we get debt downgrades, the market has a fit basically and drops as they did in 2011, all our investments will get hit. the stock market will go down as it did in a big way in the summer of 2011. on the other hand, if they extend the limits, the debt ceiling limit and do something more, maybe n
thing. >> bret: may not be the debt ceiling. >> it could be the sequester with the forced spending cuts in law to take effect. republicans live with the defense cut it's not that -- they can live with the other cuts. >> bret: journalist has historical perspective on the fun control effort. up next, gullible or culpable? the fake girlfriend of college football superstar. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealmaking. you've mastered monkey-style kung fu? no. priceline is different now. you don't even have to bid. master hahn taught you all that? oh, and he says to say (translated from cantonese) "you still owe him five bucks." your accent needs a little work. schwab bank was built with all e value and convenience tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 investors want. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like no atm fees, worldwide. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and no nuisance fees. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus deposit ches with mobile deposit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and manage your cash and investments tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab's mobile app. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 no wonder sc
, is for congress to do what it's supposed to do and needs to do and authorize an increase in the debt ceiling to pay our debts, pay our bills and that's the right way to do it, and, you know, i think that's what will eventually happen, but i don't think that going off in the other direction would be all that helpful. >> hello, chairman, i'm a second year -- [inaudible] >> second question, does the debt ceiling have a practical purpose and could it be eliminated without much consequence. >> does what have? >> the debt ceiling. >> oh, no, it doesn't really have -- symbolic value, i guess, but what -- no other country, i believe, maybe one or two other countries, but i think essentially no other countries in the world have this particular institution, just so everybody understands what it is. the congress appropriates a hundred dollars, tells the government to spend a hundred dollars on whatever, and then it raises $80 in revenue through its tax code. now the math here says, you know, go to the go borrow $20; right? no, congress has a third rule saying 100 minus 80 equals 20. if the congress is
, so as a for instance, we do not have a deal on the debt ceiling yet. we have no idea what sequestration would mean. apple is leading the market. actually gotten killed. all of these things would be told and needed to be in place in order for the market to go up and are not. i think the story here is very low expectations and investors looking at that three-year number, five-year number and saying the market is way more hospitable than i thought it would be and i need to do something different than what i've been doing all this time. >> all right. rick santelli, your take on this day. your landscape is bigger than just equities. treasury yields have been ticking up. currencies are going higher against the dollar and oil is going higher. what do you make of what's going on today? >> well, one thing just said that has a common denominator with all of those, of course, is liquefying and central bank activity whether it's bank of japan, europe, we see interest rates are up. went from 180 to testing 190. the bund violated 160, hasn't done that for a while. europe's growth is cal
to that solution, that idea, you could -- you would find that we could work out the debt ceiling. we could put all this drama and theater aside. but anyone who thinks we don't ever need to balance our budget, i think has disqualified themselves from a discussion here. >> we will certainly continue that discussion even though we didn't talk about it that much this morning, moving forward. i think you and i certainly on that issue probably agree much on just about everything. thank you so much, jim demint. we greatly appreciate you being here. >> thanks, joe. >> i've got to say, tom, it is fascinating to me, disturbing, but fascinating how it's hard to find a senator that says, you know what? i love my job. i feel like i'm really accomplishing something. i get such depressing reports from inside the senate. and i know you do, too. >> i do. almost every senator i talk to just is enormously frustrated. a lot of them like demint are leaving. olympia snowe left because she felt she couldn't get anything done. she'll be replaced by angus king, an independent from maine. when she was leaving i thought to
is this important? because we're back to this tax issue with regard to the debt ceiling potentially and revenues and we continually here about things in the past and i'll tell you this. talk to any family that's paying whatever rate they were paying in 2012 and that's the rate that makes their family work. whatever that tax rate works. it can cover their expense, buy books, scene their kids to school, put food on the table. it doesn't matter where the tax was a generation ago or three years ago because we assimilate, we're a productive capitalist society that assimilates. it on lie matters where you are. love steve liesman's presentation. it's about government spending. what i find fascinating, what we have here is on one side debt. on the other side we have stimulus but not really. okay. boy the board is even getting excited. but debt and stimulus are the same. it just depends on which side of the check you're on. the 1.2 trillion every year in debt is basically a stimulus. so why is it so shock or why is it that to stop increasing debt that once you do the numbers go down? you know what it's l
the democrats for a solution on the debt ceiling. >> we've always raised the debt ceiling. we should pay our bills as the president said, we're not a dead-bet country. i'm glad they finally saw the light. we need to pay our bills and move forward. there is a stronghold of 75 republican tea party members who quite frankly do listen to the tea party in many ways, and hopefully this is a signal that they too need to understand that this should not be an issue. it should not be held honestly. hostage. we should raise the debt ceiling. that's an automatic. we should move forward and talk about how we create jobs. by creating jobs we reduce the deficit. >> jennifer: i'm take taking it as an encouraging sign that the tea party can be moved by public voices. if they can be moved on the debt ceiling of all things, maybe they could be moved on guns. you wrote in the "huffington post," advocating reducing defense spending so you can spend more money and invest in the united states. the question is in the negotiations in congress over the spending do you see that happening? >> we've got to make it happe
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)